01 September 2015 Published in MONITORING AND EVALUATING SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECTS Written by 

Shifting Power? Assessing the Impact of Transparency and Accountability

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McGee, R. & Gaventa, J. (2011). Shifting Power? Assessing the Impact of Transparency and Accountability (Working Paper No. 383). Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. http://www.dfid.gov.uk/r4d/PDF/Outputs/Mis_SPC/60827_Wp383McGeeGaventa.pdf

This meta-review argues that current approaches to impact assessment in this field are inadequate: methodological wars are overshadowing key issues of power relations and politics. A learning approach to impact assessment is needed that gives power and politics a central place in monitoring and evaluation systems. Instead of looking at the extent to which the desired impact was achieved, it is important to look at what happened as a result of the initiative, how it happened and why. It is also important to test and revise assumptions about theories of change continually and to ensure the engagement of marginalised people in assessment processes.

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Last modified on Tuesday, 01 September 2015 14:35