Open government and open data have become the new pre-occupation of research, civic activism and advocacy in development. In the 2016 ICT4D Conference held at Nairobi, Kenya dubbed #ICT4D2016,  Tech Experts discussed the use Technology to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and the Innovation Impacts. The conference held at the Safari Park Hotel gathered hundreds attendance  all sharing ideas on Technology and Development in Africa.

The conference was organized under the theme “Social Accountability Results and Lessons in Ethiopia”. Service improvement results achieved during the implementation of Social Accountability in Ethiopia in five basic public service sectors will be presented to participants. The specific objective of the conference is to deepen the understanding of sector ministries and other national stakeholders regarding Social Accountability so that they can support the social accountability activities that are spreading in the country under the leadership of the Ministry of Finance and Economic Cooperation (MoFEC).

Alternative Ideas and Approaches

The Governance Practitioner’s Notebook takes an unusual approach for the OECD-DAC Network on Governance (GovNet). It brings together a collection of specially written notes aimed at those who work as governance practitioners within development agencies. It does so, however, without attempting to offer definitive guidance – instead aiming to stimulate thinking and debate. To aid this process the book is centred on a fictional Governance Adviser.  The Notebook’s format provides space for experts to speak on today’s governance issues: politics, public sector reform and stakeholder engagement. It encourages debate,  charts the evolution of donor thinking, and highlights future challenges in the age of the Sustainable Development Goals. Each section introduces both technical issues and major areas of debate, providing ideas for future development support to institutional reform. Expert contributors include Tom Carothers, Lant Pritchett, Matt Andrews, Heather Marquette, David Booth, Sue Unsworth, Fletcher Tembo, Ousmane Sy, Jörn Grävingholt, Nick Manning and Frauke de Weijer.

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Download the Governance Practitioner’s Notebook

 

 

Booth, D. (2012). Development as a Collective Action Problem. Addressing the Real Challenges of African Governance. Synthesis Report of the Africa Power and Politics Programme. London: ODI, for Africa Power and Politics Programme. http://www.institutions-africa.org/filestream/20121024-appp-synthesis-report-development-as-a-collective-action-problem

The Mwananchi Programme is participating in this upcoming event organized by the The University of Limerick, the Centre for Peace and Development Studies, Christian Aid and Troicare. Fletcher Tembo will be speaking in session to on ‘Thinking and Working Differently’, discussing whether current funding and monitoring and evaluation methods are fit for  purpose for working with power and politics.

The Mwananchi Programme is a member of the Govenance and Trasparency Fund event series, in which different Governance and Transparency Fund grantees present their experiences implementing their projects and discuss what they have learnt about the different aspects of governance and accountability programming.

 

Thursday 28th February, 1-2.30pm

Development actors have long raised concerns that the impact of demand-side governance projects cannot be sustained. What kinds of approaches have different Governance and Transparency Fund projects sought to develop and implement in order both to ensure the sustainability of their interventions, and to help partner organisations become self-sustaining over the long term? What efforts have been most effective and why, and what are the challenges that still lie ahead?

 

MAKING WOMEN’S VOICES COUNT: FROM PARTICIPATION TO POWER 

Part of the Governance and Transparency Fund public meeting series: ‘Demanding accountability from the bottom up’: examining what works, what does not work, and why.

Demand-side governance: are we overstating the claims on social accountability?

Public event, Overseas Development Institute and screened live online

This event will represent the first of six discussions around the broader theme of ‘demanding accountability from the bottom-up: examining what works, what does not work, and why’. These themes reflect on the four years of implementing Governance and Transparency Fund (GTF) programmes such as Mwananchi, in various parts of the world.  This event considers how a number of GTF programmes and projects focus directly on building grassroots capacity to demand improvements in state provision of public goods, especially by hitherto marginalised groups (women, disabled people, youths).

Demand-side governance: are we overstating the claims on social accountability?

21 March 2012 12:00-13:30 (GMT+00) – Public event, Overseas Development Institute and screened live online

This event will represent the first of six discussions around the broader theme of ‘demanding accountability from the bottom-up: examining what works, what does not work, and why’. These themes reflect on the four years of implementing Governance and Transparency Fund (GTF) programmes such as Mwananchi, in various parts of the world.